indieBRAG Blog

Interview Team Member Magdalena Johansson

indieBRAG has put together a great group of book bloggers to interview our B.R.A.G. Medallion Honorees. This week we would like our authors to get to know our team a bit better. Today indieBRAG Team Member Magdalena of A Bookaholic Swede  is chatting with us about her website. Why do you blog? I blog because I love to read books. And, through my blogging have I found friends all over the world that just like me likes to read and blog about books. How many books a year do you read? 389! LOL, well that’s according to Goodreads for 2015. But that also includes short stories and graphic novels. I do try to read at least 3-4 books a week, mostly because I have a lot of books to read and I keep getting/buying more. What is your favorite genres? Thriller, horror, mystery, historical, paranormal, crime, fantasy, and science-fiction. Basically everything except romance. Not that I’m totally against romance. I’m just very picky. Where are the different places you read? Either on sofas (home or my mom’s place) or my bed. Of course, I always have books with me (my trusty iPad)! What thrills you the most about reading? What thrills…

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indieBRAG Interview Team Member Erin Davies

indieBRAG has put together a great group of book bloggers to interview our B.R.A.G. Medallion Honorees. This week we would like our authors to get to know our team a bit better. Today indieBRAG Team Member Erin of Flashlight Commentary is chatting with us about her website. Erin, why do you blog? Flashlight Commentary started as a diversionary activity to break the monotony and loneliness of life as a stay at home mom with a newborn. I’d always loved books and blogging about was something I could do while my daughter slept and the rest of my social circle worked. That was six years ago. At this point Flashlight Commentary serves as my creative outlet and it connects me to one of the most diverse and fascinating communities I’ve ever experienced. I do it because I love books, love talking about book, and love interacting with others who enjoy books as much as I do. How many books a year do you read? It depends on what is going on, but I average somewhere between 100 and 150. What are your favorite genres? Historic fiction is hands down my favorite genre. I read reads a lot of this and that,…

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Interview Team Member Lisl Zlitni

indiebrag has put together a great group of book bloggers to interview our B.R.A.G. Medallion Honorees. This week we would like our authors to get to know our team a bit better. Today indiebrag Team Member Lisl Zlitni of before the second sleep is chatting with us about her website. Lisl, why do you blog? I’d like to say it’s a way for me to journal without actually having to use pen and paper—I’m often so lazy about writing in an actual book, despite loving the idea of it. The flaw with that answer, however, is that I don’t blog much that people might perceive as journal-y. When I first considered the idea of a blog, I knew I wanted whatever I blogged to help me think more deliberately, to articulate ideas rather than experience them instinctively and without further growth. And I wanted to write. I’d always loved reading and writing, and research and writing analytical papers in university to this day remains one of my happiest set of memories. I wanted to do something that picked back up on that. A few years ago I started to write book reviews and found the challenges of doing this led me…

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indieBRAG Team Member Heather Campbell

indieBRAG has put together a great group of book bloggers to interview our B.R.A.G. Medallion Honorees. This week we would like our authors to get to know our team a bit better. Today indieBRAG Team Member Heather of The Maiden’s Court is chatting with us about her website. Heather, why do you blog? I started blogging because I wanted to be able to engage in a community who were interested in the same subjects I was; my husband, at that time my boyfriend, was getting tired of hearing all about the Tudors!  I have continued blogging because of the friendships that I have made through it and it’s a fun hobby to work on. How many books a year do you read? The last couple years I have averaged between 45 and 68 – I keep striving for 70 and haven’t hit it yet! What are your favorite genres? Historical fiction, and biographical non-fiction.  I read widely in other genres too, but I don’t feature them on my blog. Where are the different places you read? I typically read before bed every night as a method of relaxation.  A couple days a week I have time to read on my…

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indieBRAG Team Member Colleen Turner

indieBRAG has put together a great group of book bloggers to interview our B.R.A.G. Medallion Honorees. This week we would like our authors to get to know our team a bit better. Today indieBRAG Team Member Colleen of A Literary Vacation is chatting with us about her website. Colleen, why do you blog? I started blogging because I had been reviewing for a few other blogs for a while and thought…why not start my own?!  While it does take a lot of time to format the posts and get them just right, I continue to blog because I absolutely love this wonderful bookish community I have found and I cannot think of a better way to interact with everyone than to share the books I love and those book and authors I’m excited to discover. How many books a year do you read? About 50. What is your favorite genre? My absolute favorite genre is historical fiction, but I also love historical nonfiction, literary fiction, and mysteries and thrillers. Where are the different places you read? Honestly I’ll read anywhere, but the main places I read are my couch, my bed, and my office at work.  If the weather is…

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Dreaming Through Summer by Anna Belfrage

To me, summer is clogs, mosquitoes, ice-cream and lying on my back staring up at the sky through the foliage of a birch tree. “Hmph!” Matthew Graham says from somewhere inside my head. “Shows you’ve never been a farmer.” I glance at him, this 17th century hero of mine. A farmer? Yes, I suppose he is, a tall strong man who has spent endless weeks in back-breaking labour just to clear the fields he now has planted. The maples and sycamores, the huge American chestnuts – all gone, as Matthew Graham single-handedly turns American wilderness into fields and pastures to feed his family. But today, I’ve decided to treat him to a picnic, a recreation of a perfect childhood day (mine, not his. His would involve a lot of work, seeing as he was his Da’s main helper on their little Scottish manor) “A picnic?” He gives me a doubtful look. “The hay needs to be brought in, and I’ve got fences to mend, and…” I hold up my hand. “Even an imaginary character needs a break now and then.” “Imaginary?” He throws his head back and laughs. “If I don’t exist, why are you talking to me?” Good question,…

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Seafood Chowder- A Southern Favorite

A Beautiful Glittering Lie: A Novel of the Civil War by J.D.R. Hawkins Susan Weintrob  indieBRAG Food Blogger Everydayhappyfoods   So many of the original Southern cities were close to the coast, where fish or other seafood was plentiful.  They were often added to chowder for a fabulous, rich flavor.  As the war between the North and South progressed, the Confederate troops suffered greatly as supplies were cut off.  The basic foods were hard to come by. This chowder can be made from corn and potatoes without seafood or fish and is equally delicious.  For troops near farms, potatoes and corn, onions and celery would have been available, as would have milk or cream. Bacon was a stock item for both armies and would have been available except when supplies were extremely scarce. Stock was made from scraps of vegetables, saved from other meal preparation. Wine was a treat, but we can think of making this recipe or receipt, as recipes were called through the 19th century, in 1861 when ingredients still would have been stocked—certainly for the officers. Recipes for stock and chowder have been found among recipes of the era. For our modern cooks, the base of the…

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IndieBRAG Cover Crush: To Catch A Falling Star by Anna Belfrage

Synopsis To Catch a Falling Star’ is the eighth book in Anna Belfrage’s series featuring time traveller Alexandra Lind and her seventeenth century husband, Matthew Graham.  Some gifts are double-edged swords… For Matthew Graham, being given the gift of his former Scottish manor is a dream come true. For his wife, Alex, this gift will force her to undertake a perilous sea journey, leaving most of their extensive family in the Colony of Maryland. Alex is torn apart by this, but staying behind while her husband travels to Scotland is no option. Scotland in 1688 is a divided country, torn between the papist Stuart king and the foreign but Protestant William of Orange. In the Lowlands, popular opinion is with Dutch William, and Matthew’s reluctance to openly support him does not endear him to his former friends and neighbours. While Matthew struggles to come to terms with the fact that Scotland of 1688 bears little resemblance to his lovingly conserved memories, Alex is forced to confront unresolved issues from her past, including her overly curious brother-in-law, Luke Graham. And then there’s the further complication of the dashing, flamboyant Viscount Dundee, a man who knocks Alex completely off her feet. All…

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Marketing Your Book(s) by Alison Morton

Why marketing? Publishing a book yourself is fun as well as hard work. But if you are going to sell your book, you need to adopt some commercial principles and practicalities. We often hear “sales and marketing” bracketed together, but they are two distinctly different things, although intimately connected. Marketing as a way of building awareness of yourself, your work and your brand, thus creating a demand in the customer’s mind so that they will seek you out – basically, the battle for the mind. Sales, on the other hand, is focused on persuading the customer to buy by meeting a need at the right time. But readers can be turned off by overly aggressive sales tactics. Now I love talking to readers face to face and sharing the fun and fascination of my Roma Nova books with them. But there’s a lot of work leading up to the point when you sell that reader your book, and that’s all about marketing. So let’s get down to marketing The pre-requisite is a good product. A well-edited story, with professional layout and design, a great back cover blurb and stunning cover are all taken as given. (Well, the B.R.A.G. Medallion award…

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Choice of Genre by Malcolm Noble

The blurb says that I have written fifteen mystery novels set in the south of England from the 1920s to the 1960s.  However, my recent work has focused on the earlier part of the period.  It is the 1920s and 30s where I feel most at home.  I was born in 1951 My choice of detective fiction (and I am quite picky about the boundary between detective stories and the crime novel) was inevitable.  John Creasey's Hammer the Toff was the first adult book that I read (when the village librarian allowed me to borrow the book with my pink 'Junior Reader' ticket).  Since then, buying, selling, reading and writing detective novels has been an important part of my life.  Most of all, I like talking about them. When, last month, a customer was browsing around my bookshop, we realised that we were detection enthusiasts and talked, for far too long, about the good and bad in the genre.  Through that discussion, with surprising little disagreement, we moved towards defining what made a truly satisfying detective novel.  We realised that readers who come to the genre in retrospect - like us - are probably more critical than those who had…

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